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Publications

Browse our publications to learn more about how we protect courageous immigrant women and girls through service in communities, courts, and Congress.

  • Tahirih Statement on New Proposed EOIR Rule to Restrict Asylum

    • Publication Date: September 22, 2020
    • Publication Categories: Statements

    In yet another attack on asylum, the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) proposed new rules on September 21, 2020 that would further increase barriers to asylum—dealing yet another blow to survivors of gender-based violence who are trying to access safety and justice. Among the proposed changes include shortened and stricter deadlines for asylum seekers to submit applications, requiring individuals in deportation proceedings to file within 15 days of their first hearing. Survivors would also face a narrow 180-day adjudication deadline for asylum applications and not be allowed continuances past that deadline, with limited exceptions.

  • Joint Comment Submitted in Response to USCIS Policy Manual Chapters on Applying Discretion in USCIS Adjudications

    • Publication Date: September 14, 2020
    • Publication Categories: Comments

    A coalition of organizations that assist, support, and advocate on behalf of immigrant survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking and other abuses submitted comments to object to the USCIS Policy Manual’s newest provisions regarding applying discretion in USCIS adjudications, including employment authorization. We are deeply concerned about the myriad ways this guidance will foreclose such survivors from the humanitarian relief that Congress specifically created for them, putting them at risk of continued harm.

  • Tahirih Statement on Sweeping Proposal to Expand Biometrics Collection

    • Publication Date: September 10, 2020
    • Publication Categories: Statements

    On September 4, 2020, the administration proposed sweeping regulations that would dramatically expand biometric submission requirements for immigration applications—giving the government maximal information about immigrants and their family members.

  • Tahirih Comment in Response to the Information Collection at OMB Control Number 1125-0013

    • Publication Date: September 07, 2020
    • Publication Categories: Comments

    The Tahirih Justice Center submitted comments in response to the Information Collection, OMB Control Number 1125-0013, issued by the Department of Justice on July 13, 2020 pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

  • Tahirih Comment in Response to the Information Collection at OMB Control Number 1125-0012

    • Publication Date: September 07, 2020
    • Publication Categories: Comments

    Tahirih submitted comments in response to the Information Collection, OMB Control Number 1125-0012, issued by the Department of Justice on July 13, 2020 pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

  • Victory in Lawsuit Challenging the Use of Border Patrol to Conduct Credible Fear Interviews

    • Publication Date: August 31, 2020
    • Publication Categories: Statements

    Judge Leon in the District Court of the District of Columbia issued a preliminary injunction prohibiting the deportation of families and the use of Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents to screen asylum seekers for their ‘credible fear’ of persecution while a lawsuit remains pending. Tahirih filed the lawsuit on March 27, 2020 on behalf of women and children currently detained at the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas. In partnership with the Constitutional Accountability Center, Tahirih challenged this practice on a variety of grounds. Tahirih has also sought information on this clandestine policy through a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit to compel the government to release records on this troubling practice.

  • Tahirih Statement on Sweeping Proposed Changes to Immigration Courts

    • Publication Date: August 24, 2020
    • Publication Categories: Statements

    On August 21, 2020 the administration proposed sweeping regulations to change procedures in immigration court— making it even more difficult for immigrant survivors of violence to seek protection in the United States.